China: Ferrari introduce a blown rear wing

In the first practice in China, Ferrari unveiled their new rear wing, which features a blown flap in a similar manner to McLaren.  Mclaren have infamously produced the F-Duct which uses a duct controlled by the driver to alter airflow around the rear wing to stall it at high speed to gain more top speed.  Is this an F-Duct as used by McLaren, may be not.

Unlike the McLaren and Saubers set ups, the Ferrari solution does not appear to have the driver interacting with the duct.  Instead the wing is fed with airflow coming from an inlet high up on the engine cover, well away from the drivers reach.  It is possible that the there is additional ducting inside the car that does allow the driver to control airflow through the duct.  But so far no signs of a driver controlled inlet around the cockpit are evident.  It could be Ferraris set up uses pure aerodynamics to affect the duct, by choking at high speed (safely well above the maximum corner speed). 

Latest: Alonso to Autosport.com  “I had nothing inside the cockpit because the system is not complete. We tested the engine cover to compare it with the standard one. I didn’t notice anything. I guess there will some new numbers from an aero point of view.”

We will update this post as more info emerges over the weekend.

9 thoughts on “China: Ferrari introduce a blown rear wing

  1. A copy/paste from Autosport:

    “Alonso also said that the first evaluation of Ferrari’s F-Duct system would need careful analysis from the team’s engineers, with only the engine cover unit being run so far.

    ” “The F-system was not active,” he said. “We tested some parts of the engine cover and the rear wing to validate them and to check they worked fine, but the aerodynamicists will now gather data. But the system was not complete.

    ” “I had nothing inside the cockpit because the system is not complete. We tested the engine cover to compare it with the standard one. I didn’t notice anything. I guess there will some new numbers from an aero point of view.” “

  2. If I understand correctly you cannot use this system without driver intervention.
    Even if you set it to stall the wing at speeds higher than maximum cornering speeds, you will need to shut it down BEFORE braking at the end of the straight. Braking with a stalled rear wing, that suddenly becames active as speed goes dowm, is not what you want to do.
    Scarbs, do you imagine a way to do this without driver action?

    • I don’t think the effect would be that on and off. McLaren are getting 5-8 kph on the straights, which is not a lot. The wing is still there, just not working as efficiently hence creating less drag; there is still downforce being generated. In regards to how the Ferrari system might operate, would it be legal to have some sort of spring loaded (or similar action, I can think of a few ways to do this) flap inside the duct that is opened when enough air pressure is generated, allowing airflow through the duct to the rear wing? I can also imagine some sort of air ducting venturi switch that again operates at certain air pressures, but with no moving parts.

      • It would not be legal to have a trap door in your aerodynamic system, as it is not legal to have any moving aero parts on the car. Even parts that flex too much are banned (flexy floor, last year when the Toyota’s were disqualified for overly flexible rear wing)

        The “aerodynamic” switch is the only real option other than driver activation, but it requires much tricker maths to figure out how to do it just from airspeed… and again you don’t have the advantage of turning it off for braking, which you can do with the F-duct… while that change in downforce might not be disastrous, it would be advantageous.

  3. Pingback: Ferrari’s F-duct design and more pictures from Chinese GP Friday practice | PooZ

  4. Pingback: Ελεύθερα δοκιμαστικά Gran Prix Κίνας. Τα μάτια όλων στα F-Duck | AutoBlog

  5. Would it be possible to control the F Duct with the break pedal? It seems you only want the F Duct to work when not under breaking. Thoughts?

  6. Pingback: Ferrari’s F-duct design and more pictures from Chinese GP Friday practice | F1 Fanatic - The Formula 1 Blog

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