Ferrari: New Front Wing Analysis (summary)

Ferrari tried out a new Front Wing in Free Practice for the Korean GP.  It’s rumoured to be a 2012 part being tested at the final races of this season.  I will write a fuller analysis over the weekend, but here is the summary of its new features.

In layout the wing is a modern take on the 3 element wing and for the first time at Ferrari features and endplate-less design.  Ferrari wing layout has been largely the same since the 2009 F60.  With the endplate and the cascades attached to it removed.  You can see the wing curls down to form the endplate itself.

Rather than a 3-element wing with a mainplane and two flaps, it is formed of a main plane, which is slotted to create two elements for most its span, with a single flap attached behind it.

The vertical sections of wing forming the endplate, are outswept and overlapping.  This allied to the vane (removed in this pic) aids the flow around the front tyre.

Only the inner section of flap is adjustable.  The outer part of the flap is fixed and cannot be adjusted, nor can the middle element as its formed from the structural main plane.  The adjuster mechanism is visible between the moveable\fixed section of flap, the socket for the wrench to alter the front flap angle, is also clearly visible.

8 thoughts on “Ferrari: New Front Wing Analysis (summary)

  1. Word is Newey said half of their FW in Monza went missing after WEB wrecked. Taking a look at this picture could leave one to believe it ended up in Maranello.—> http://www.motorsport.nextgen-auto.com/gallery/pictures/2011/f1/gp-korea-15oct/525_medium.jpg The wing bare a striking resemblance to the FW of RBR cars. I’m a Scuderia fan & I’m fine with it. Copying it will help Ferrari understand & learn, then they can make their own. What say you Scarbs?

    • yes they are very similar…but if half of webbers front wing went missing in moza then what on earth is supporting the other half sticking out of the cockpit in the picture in scarb’s article ‘Red Bull: Splitter scandal 2011?’?

      • I believe the words I used are “word is”. And just because it may be there in that picture doesn’t mean it made it back to their garage. I’m not saying it didn’t, nor am I saying it did. I don’t know. I only made a suggestion according to some comments Newey supposedly made. I’m not sure either way.

      • I’m pretty sure the missing section of wing is in some italian fans home. I doubt it would have made its way to Ferrari. I don’t think having a section of the Red Bull endplate\cascade would be necessary to copy the RBR design philosophy and I dont think the few weeks since Monza are enough to: copy, draw, test in CFD, test in FEA, test in the wind tunnel, make the tooling, create the mould, laminate, assemble and rig test a completely new wing. We’ve known that the 2012 wing has been coming for some time, we can’t link its appearance to Monza.

  2. I agree with Crucial_Xtreme: this “new” ferrari wing looks exactly identical to rbr’sand has kept nothing in common with previous ferrari wings (see endplates, fixed external part of the flap, wedge regulator, rounded tip of mainplane, slotted mainplane ect) and has taken that directly from the rbr shape.

    It’s strange to see a complete revolution of all the wing details all in once, all of them converging to the same arrangement rbr has (and not for example getting similar to rbr in one palace and similar to mclaren in another).

    The interesting part of it is that to obtain such a shape ferrari has had to take an aggressive structual approach: for example the mainplane is much thinner than before and features a slot, and that makes the task of the structures engineer more difficult

  3. The new wing is heavily copied. Alonso did complain, in a way, about this new wing.

    Scarbs, do you think Ferrari might have excagerated with making an almost identical copy of the Red Bull wing, perhaps missing out on diverting the airflow the correct way around, above and under the car?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s